Erosion: Layered Porcelain Sculptures Sandblasted to Mimic Biological Forms

British ceramicist Tamsin van Essen is fascinated by what she describes as the “the fragile boundary between attraction and repulsion,” a place where tension is created by the visible and the obscured. For her Erosion series Essen created layered blocks of alternating black and white porcelain which she then sandblasted to mimic biological forms similar to a parasitic virus in the process of devouring a host. In a even more literal example, she created a series of ceramic vessels that appear to be infected with specific bacteria. […]

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A new way to remove CO2 from the atmosphere | Jennifer Wilcox

26 Jul 2018

 

Our planet has a carbon problem — if we don’t start removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, we’ll grow hotter, faster. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox previews some amazing technology to scrub carbon from the air, using chemical reactions that capture and reuse CO2 in much the same way trees do … but at a vast scale. This detailed talk reviews both the promise and the pitfalls.

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Blue Carbon. An invisible time bomb.

Just Have a Think

Ocean Acidification is perhaps the most well publicised consequence of increased levels of carbon dioxide being absorbed by our oceans. But as the oceans also absorb vast quantities of heat from our human activities, and sea levels rise as a result of melting ice caps and thermal expansion, another less well known but no less precious store of Carbon is being threatened, with potentially disastrous consequences.

Help support and influence the growth of the Just Have a Think initiative here:
http://www.patreon.com/justhaveathink

Research Links –
https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/chapter/cha…

https://www.thebluecarboninitiative.org/

https://www.conservation.org/blog/wha…

https://www.conservation.org/blog/cli…

https://www.theguardian.com/environme…

https://www.iucn.org/resources/issues…

https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetin…

https://www.wildernesscommittee.org/e…

https://www.esa.int/esearch?q=ocean+CO2

JHAT Ocean Acidification Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFUEz…

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The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change: 2019 report

The 2019 report of the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change shows that climate change is already damaging the health of the world’s children and is set to shape the wellbeing of an entire generation unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to well below 2˚C.
Read the 2019 report: https://hubs.ly/H0lN8md0
Published: November 14, 2019
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How Jacob Lawrence’s Paintings Captured the African American Experience – My Modern Met

How much do you know about Jacob Lawrence’s “The Migration Series” paintings?

New York City has always attracted avant-garde artists. From the energetic Abstract Expressionists to the pioneers of American Pop Art, forward-thinking creatives have flocked to the city that never sleeps for decades. While each and every modern movement cultivated in the Big Apple has made its mark on the history of art, the Harlem Renaissance enabled an entire population to flourish.

Throughout the 1920s and into the 30s, New York City’s Harlem neighborhood thrived as a cultural hub for African Americans. During this “golden age,” the arts thrived, culminating in a cultural movement that saw the creation of one of modern art’s most moving works: The Migration Series, a prolific collection of paintings by African American artist Jacob Lawrence.

 

The Inspiration Behind The Migration Series

Jacob Lawrence, Panel 40 (“Great Numbers”) from the “Migration Series,” 1940-1941 (Photo: Ron Cogswell via Flickr Public Domain)Completed in 1941, The Migration Series colorfully tells the story of the Great Migration—a mass exodus of over 6 million African Americans from the South. Fleeing economic hardship and laws shaped by segregation, these individuals relocated to urban areas in the West, Midwest, and—most prominently—the North. In these new cities, the migrants mostly stuck together, forming supportive communities by settling into neighborhoods like Harlem.

“The Harlem section of Manhattan, which covers just three square miles, drew nearly 175,000 African Americans, giving the neighborhood the largest concentration of black people in the world,” the National Museum of African American History and Culture explains. “Harlem became a destination for African Americans of all backgrounds. From unskilled laborers to an educated middle-class, they shared common experiences of slavery, emancipation, and racial oppression, as well as a determination to forge a new identity as free people.”[…]

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Map of Areas Most Often Missing During Handwashing

With news of more than 70,000 confirmed cases and 1700 deaths from the COVID-19 virus, the importance of handwashing is once again front and center. Using data from a 1978 study on the hygiene of health professionals, this is a map of the most missed areas when washing hands.

This more recent paper contains a short review of various studies of missed areas, most of which conclude that people often forget to wash their fingertips:

In 2008, the WHO designed a handwashing leaflet, making reference to Taylor, who indicated that the fingertips, interdigital areas, thumbs, and wrists are the most commonly missed areas in handwashing. Pan et al. also found that the tips of the nails and the fingertips had the largest amount of residual florescent stains left after handwashing among healthcare workers in Taiwan. The commonly missed areas among medical students in the study conducted by Vanyolos et al. was the first metacarpal, the proximal part of the palm (lateral), the distal phalanges, and the nail beds. In healthcare workers in Škodová et al.’s study, the thumbs and fingertips were the most commonly missed areas. In this study, the most frequently missed area was also the fingertips. However, the medial aspect and back of the hand were the second and third most missed areas, respectively. Moreover, the interdigital area and the front and back of the fingers were the least missed areas, which is in contrast to Taylor’s study.[…]

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The Real Implications Of Ex Machina’s Turing Test

Video essay exploring the real implications of Ex Machina’s Turing Test.

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Misha Makarov’s photos –  VK in 2020 | Stair railing design

Feb 14, 2020 – Misha Makarov’s photos – 4,179 photos | VK

Source: Misha Makarov’s photos – 4,179 photos | VK in 2020 | Stair railing design, Staircase design, Modern stairs

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ArtHunter on Instagram: “Quote of the day 💭 – “The man who cannot visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot.” ― Andre Breton – Sculpture art

Feb 16, 2020 – ArtHunter on Instagram: “Quote of the day 💭 – “The man who cannot visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot.” ― Andre Breton – Ear by Michael Beitz”

Source: ArtHunter on Instagram: “Quote of the day 💭 – “The man who cannot visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot.” ― Andre Breto… in 2020 | Street art, Street art graffiti, Sculpture art

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Saving the World’s Oldest Languages

While there are more than 7,000 languages spoken around the world, many are in danger of dying out. In this reel, we’re learning new tongues and meeting people trying to save languages ranging from Osing to Quechua.

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