What hallucination reveals about our minds

Neurologist and author Oliver Sacks brings our attention to Charles Bonnet syndrome — when visually impaired people experience lucid hallucinations. He describes the experiences of his patients in heartwarming detail and walks us through the biology of this under-reported phenomenon.

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Why Isn’t Beer Sold in Plastic Bottles?

In this video:

Plastic as a material has pretty much changed the way we live our lives- it’s cheap, can be moulded into practically any shape and is, for the most the part, easily recyclable (when people bother to). So why is it that we still use glass bottles and cans to store our beer in? Is it to do with aesthetics? Taste? Or is there another factor at play?

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This Instagram Page Showcases Incredible Design Solutions And Their 172k Followers Love It

 

There is so much on the internet that can get you down or angry that you have to stop and appreciate the pages that calm your soul. Topdezigners is an Instagram page that reposts gorgeous sleek, modern, and innovative furniture, room, and even outdoor architectural designs.[…]

Source: This Instagram Page Showcases Incredible Design Solutions And Their 172k Followers Love It

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The Math Trick Behind MP3s, JPEGs, and Homer Simpson’s Face

Over a decade ago, I was sitting in a college math physics course and my professor spelt out an idea that kind of blew my mind. I think it isn’t a stretch to say that this is one of the most widely applicable mathematical discoveries, with applications ranging from optics to quantum physics, radio astronomy, MP3 and JPEG compression, X-ray crystallography, voice recognition, and PET or MRI scans. This mathematical tool—named the Fourier transform, after 18th-century French physicist and mathematician Joseph Fourier—was even used by James Watson and Francis Crick to decode the double helix structure of DNA from the X-ray patterns produced by Rosalind Franklin. (Crick was an expert in Fourier transforms, and joked about writing a paper called, “Fourier Transforms for birdwatchers,” to explain the math to Watson, an avid birder.)

You probably use a descendant of Fourier’s idea every day, whether you’re playing an MP3, viewing an image on the web, asking Siri a question, or tuning in to a radio station. (Fourier, by the way, was no slacker. In addition to his work in theoretical physics and math, he was also the first to discover the greenhouse effect.)

So what was Fourier’s discovery, and why is it useful? Imagine playing a note on a piano. When you press the piano key, a hammer strikes a string that vibrates to and fro at a certain fixed rate (440 times a second for the A note). As the string vibrates, the air molecules around it bounce to and fro, creating a wave of jiggling air molecules that we call sound. If you could watch the air carry out this periodic dance, you’d discover a smooth, undulating, endlessly repeating curve that’s called a sinusoid, or a sine wave. (Clarification: In the example of the piano key, there will really be more than one sine wave produced. The richness of a real piano note comes from the many softer overtones that are produced in addition to the primary sine wave. A piano note can be approximated as a sine wave, but a tuning fork is a more apt example of a sound that is well-approximated by a single sinusoid.)[…]

Source: The Math Trick Behind MP3s, JPEGs, and Homer Simpson’s Face

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Giangrande – Free to Roam [Official Video]

music: Giangrande
album: Beauty at Closing Time
director and animator: Gianluca Maruotti
post/edit: Gabriele Maruotti
producer: Mondocane
made with Dragonframe
© 2018 […]

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Making Vodka From Sheep

Ryan Hartshorn’s family runs a sheep cheesery in Tasmania. But it wasn’t enough for Ryan to simply make cheese. He aspired to make vodka, too, using the whey leftover from the cheese-making process. Vodka? From sheep’s whey? But how? Never been done before, but Ryan figured it out, and his boutique spirit has won top honors at the World Vodka Awards. Baa-toms up.

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Illuminating Lamps Made From Real Bread by Yukiko Morita

Japanese artist Yukiko Morita always loved bread. Not only was it delicious but there was something about that special combination of flour and yeast that produced wonderful flavors, beautiful tones, and adorable shapes that make people feel warm inside. This profound passion for pan (Japanese for bread and was borrowed from Portuguese) eventually led Morita down a unique path that combined lighting design and baking.[…]

Source: Illuminating Lamps Made From Real Bread by Yukiko Morita

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Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

Baltimore-based artists Jessie and Katey, started creating murals because of the sheer accessibility of public art. The pair have always created work with a big visual impact, but as their designs grew they began to consider the possibility of working on the ground in addition to large-scale walls. Their site-specific floor works combine inspirations from both textiles and board games to create interactive walkways that encourage play and exploration. Jessie and Katey explain to Colossal that “the compositions are inspired by the viewer and how they might travel through the work. It’s really fun watching little kids interact with the floor murals—they always know what to do.”

The math behind both textile design and quilting is an aspect that the pair must consider when painting their large-scale works, and have started to inform how the pair begins each piece’s early designs. “We approach our large-scale work a bit like screen printers, even though we don’t screen print,” the pair explains. “Our process of execution is very methodical and we tend to think in planes or layers. This is probably a result of having to develop concepts and adapt them to larger spaces in a short amount of time. It’s interesting that painting murals has informed how we paint murals.”[…]

Source: Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

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Taking Risks With All Kinds of Poison

Working with and even cooking with deadly poison—despite the risks, people do it all the time. In this reel, we’ll meet everyone from a gardener who tends to plants that could kill him to the residents of a Japanese island who dare to cook with a highly poisonous plant.

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Over Fifty Artists Showcase Work Within Notebook Spreads for the 8th Annual ‘Moleskine Project’

Back for an eighth year, the annual Moleskine Project, curated by Rodrigo Luff and Spoke Art, brings together a diverse slate of artists all working within the confines of a Moleskine notebook. Featuring over fifty artists from around the world, this year’s exhibiting artists include Laura Berger (previously), Kevin Peterson (previously), and Martine Johanna.[…]

Source: Over Fifty Artists Showcase Work Within Notebook Spreads for the 8th Annual ‘Moleskine Project’

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